Windy Enough for Mary Poppins?

It is windy on the prairie today. I mean, like 52mph kind of winds. The kind of wind that keeps me indoors with cup after cup of tea.

There are things I’m supposed to do in town, but I’m chicken of driving when I see the snow in my yard blowing like all the demons of hell are chasing it into Iowa.

Off highway 10 in Worthington, MN.


We have a book which I was compelled to buy for our children. It’s called, If you’re not from the prairie… (by David Douchard, pictures by Henry Ripplinger) and it praises the prairie things which I, a transplant, find so bizarre. It praises the cold; it praises the sky; it praises the wind.

All the things which I struggle to accept.

Cold can, thankfully, be combated. I bundle up. I wear lots of scarves. (Not all at the same time.) I stay indoors. I press the seat-warmer button on car the instant I climb in. (Or sooner.) And I have learned that there are temperatures at which you cannot spray your window with washer fluid without risking a total ice-over. Never a good idea when driving down I 35 in the middle of the Twin Cities. Yes, I speak from experience.

The sky, huge and cloud-filled and sometimes ominous, is, somehow, much more visible than out in Washington State, where I grew up. There the sky is often hidden by towering pine trees, or obscured by mountains…or rain. Here I frequently get fooled by the sky. I am not good at reading its moods, at identifying the clouds. Still, after 18 years in the mid-west, I find myself thinking that low, white clouds on the horizon are snow-covered mountain peaks. I know perfectly well that this is wishful thinking, but old habits are hard to break.

And then there’s the wind on the prairie, with nothing to stop it but a few groves of leafless trees. It roars and rushes in a mad rage. It blows powdery snow across the roads and kills unlucky travelers and twists into wizard-of Oz-sized corkscrews of terror.

Is there anything good I can say about the wind?

Well…maybe, if it blows Mary Poppins my way, that would be nice…

8 thoughts on “Windy Enough for Mary Poppins?

    • So…you agree with me about the wind? I thought you’d be quoting one about the Holy Spirit as the breath of God…’cause that’s a form of the wind that I can appreciate!

  1. I don’t like the wind either. I think it comes from growing up in that house in Buckhorn that when the wind blew hard from the North-East the walls would move. I think the big beam that went to that waterside wall, in out bedroom, was added to help stop that. The nice thing about that was that the swing was hung on that beam I believe. Anyway, I can’t think of anything good about wind except that it blows the storm away also. I do like wind chimes though! And kites!

    • Wind chimes will always remind me of K & E’s, I think now – over Christmas we heard them in our room! Yes, the swing was wonderful and I wish we had more pictures of it. I don’t remember the walls moving, but I do remember hearing about it. What a rotten builder. The wind has actually be not too bad here this winter – maybe that’s why it was such a brutal reminder when it WAS! I had to chase a check I was depositing across the road when it blew out of my hands at the drive-up window once. that was a drag!

  2. Oh, I remember reading that If you’re not from the prairie book. I need to get my hands on it. What positive things can I say about the wind? I like the sound of it rushing when you’re all snugged into your house on a cold winter day. I love the sound through the trees in the summer, that soothing sound that reminds me of water flowing. But then I am a prairie native.

  3. Yes, when I’m cozied up at home the wind isn’t so bad! I like the sound of the rain then, too – which may come from being a Washington native! It will be intereesting to see how my kids come to feel about the wind as they grow up…

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