7 thoughts on “The Unpleasant Side of Nature

    • Oh, I do know, though, that they died from the lack of rain over the summer and fall. They couldn’t get out of the stream; there just wasn’t enough water. I have to drive every day over the bridge about 50 yards away from all of them and all fall it stank to high heaven. I am NOT looking foward to what it’s going to smell like if something isn’t done about them.

  1. Gretchen, actually the only good carp is a dead carp. Nature has a way of restoring balance.We had a “fishkill”
    the first year we moved here. Yes, you can remove them
    and put them on the land as fertilizer-but how to do it? so we took their advice(DNR) and did not go close to the beach for about 3 weeks and then “viole”(sp?) the only thing left were a few gill plates which disappeared soon thereafter also.The lake was so much better without the carp eating all the water plants and stirring up the silt.Then the game fish have a prayer of a chance to grow and reproduce. The fertilizer made the grass nice and green at the edge of the lake too. Nature will surely take care of itself.The dead fish will soon sink and replentish the river bottom with nutrients. Meanwhile birds and coons will have a feast. Be patient, this too shall pass. Sh

    • Oh, I totally agree that there are too many – I even talked to the seine fishermen yesterday, out on Lake Bella – but it’s just so incredibly gross! Even if it is good in the long run…it’s still yucky!

    • Yes, they are seining on Lake Bella today – I’ll post about it on Monday! Pretty cool. He said that they may do Ocheda before summer…but he wasn’t positive.

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